The Grand Opera House at 400 Texas St. showed the first movie ever screened in Shreveport, a short film of a bullfight, on December 22, 1896.  Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives and Special Collections, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
 In the shadow of the newly constructed post office in 1912 (now Shreve Memorial Library), The Bijou sits quietly at 412 Texas St. The Bijou was one of several nickelodeons in downtown Shreveport.  Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives and Special Collections, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
 The Majestic began life in 1904 as a Vaudeville theater before transitioning to primarily a movie house just two years later. In 1955 the building was demolished to make way for the new Selber’s Brothers department store.   Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives, Barham Collection, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
 Julian and Abe Saenger were pharmacists turned theater owners who started out small in Shreveport, then became movie theater magnates with properties across the south and into South America and the Caribbean. Though The Saenger at 616 Milam St. (later, The Capri), wore their name, their flagship theater would be The Strand.  Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives, Barham Collection, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
   
  
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  “The Million Dollar Theater” opened in 1925 and enjoyed a long life as a movie theater. Today, Shreveporters still flock to The Strand to see the best in live entertainment from around the nation.   Credit: Courtesy of Downtown Development Authority
 The Joy operated at 623 Texas St., right next door to where the Robinson Film Center is today. These days, the building still sees a lot of business as On Time Fashion.   Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives and Special Collections, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
   
  
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   A member of the regional Joy theater chain, The Joy Drive-in Theatre occupied the open air of the still developing Texas Ave. Today, the main post office sits in that spot.   Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives, Barham Collection, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
   
  
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  A member of the regional Joy theater chain, The Joy Drive-in Theatre occupied the open air of the still developing Texas Ave. Today, the main post office sits in that spot.   Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives, Barham Collection, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
   
  
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  A block away from what is now the downtown bus station, The Don was a hit with teenage girls in the 1960s for playing The Beatles  A Hard Day’s Night  and in its later years showed classics like  The Wizard of Oz . The Don closed in 1981, leaving downtown without a first-run movie theater for almost three decades.   Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives, Barham Collection, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
  The Wizard of Oz  opened at The Capitol, 513 Milam St. in 1939, but received second billing in the Centenary Conglomerate to the Marx Brothers’ latest playing down the street at The Majestic on the corner of Milam and McNeil.   Credit: Courtesy of Centenary College of Louisiana Archives, Centenary Conglomerate, November 17, 193
   
  
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   The Strand opened  Another Thin Man  in 1940, the sequel to the popular  The Thin Man  of 1934.   Credit: Courtesy of Centenary College of Louisiana Archives, Centenary Conglomerate, January 19, 1940
   
  
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  The Capitol showed one of silent comedy star Harold Lloyd’s few talking pictures  The Cat’s Paw  in 1939.  Credit: Courtesy of Centenary College of Louisiana Archives, Centenary Conglomerate, November 17, 1939
   
  
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  The Star Theatre at 1041 Texas Ave. was an all-black theater that both showed movies and hosted Vaudeville acts.   Credit: Courtesy of Chris Brown, The Shreveport Sun, June 14, 1930.
   
  
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   Long before the digital cinema of today, two projectionists at The Don, 516 Crockett St., work the dual changeover projection system common through much of the 20th century.   Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives, Barham Collection, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
   
  
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   Staff members of The Don, 516 Crockett St., pose for a group photo.   Credit: Courtesy of LSU-Shreveport Archives, Barham Collection, Noel Memorial Library, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA
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